Mindset and Say Yes to Travel

Mindset and Say Yes to Travel

“Your advice is great if you are middle-class, your parents are giving you money, or you’re from the West. Your website can never work for me. I’m too poor to travel. This advice is only for privileged people.” I encounter this line of thought frequently, and after two recently published articles on Thrillist and Thought Catalog, I’ve heard it even more lately.

Every travel naysayer believes their situation is special, that they can’t manage what someone else did for reason X, Y, or Z. And it’s not just travel. We all make excuses as to why we can’t do something we desire. “The gym is too far away.” “Just one more cookie won’t hurt.” “I’m not tall enough to play basketball.” We believe we’ll never accomplish that great thing we aspire to because we lack the one secret ingredient to make it happen.

When it comes to travel, people think what’s holding them back is money. They imagine they can’t travel because, unlike me, they can’t tap the Bank of Mom and Dad, are burdened by their debt, and simply assume I’m just lucky and special.

People with this mindset remind me of Bob, who dismissed this website a few years ago because he didn’t believe I could travel the world without parental help. People like Bob shoot the messenger because it allows them to ignore the message and keep their worldview unchallenged.

Tagged In:

Rakibul Smith

As sunrise and sunset are calculated from the leading and trailing edges of the Sun, and not the center, the duration of a day time is slightly longer than night time. Further, because the light from the Sun is refracted as it passes through the Earth’s atmosphere.

Related Post

Leave a Reply

Theme Demos
Buy Now